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Full text of "After ten years, the service record of "Incor" 24-hour cement."



351-2. 




APR 1 9 1937 



AFTER TEN YEARS- 



THE SERVICE 
RECORD OF 
'INCOR' 24-HOUR 
CEMENT 



LONE STAR CEMENT CORPORATION 



Manufacturers of 

LONE STAR CEMENT 

and 

'INCOR' 24-HOUR CEMENT 

OFFICES: 

ALBANY 

BIRMINGHAM 

BOSTON 

CHICAGO 

DALLAS 

HOUSTON 

INDIANAPOLIS 

KANSAS CITY 

NEW ORLEANS 

NEW YORK 

NORFOLK 

PHILADELPHIA 

ST. LOUIS 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

GENERAL OFFICES: 

342 MADISON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Copyright, 1937 



A 



new era in concrete engineering opened 
when 'Incor' 24-Hour Cement was introduced, 
in 1927. Improved manufacturing methods had 
reduced the time required for concrete to at- 
tain service strength — and 5 to 7 days' curing 
then accomplished what had taken 10 to 21 
days a decade before. 

But the makers of Lone Star Cement saw 
the need for a true Portland Cement which 
would cure or harden thoroughly in 24 hours, 
and pioneered in this further forward step. 

That was ten years ago. Today the strength 
and durability of 'Incor' concrete have been 
proven by a decade of use. Many miles of con- 
crete paving and hundreds of concrete struc- 
tures attest both the high early and high ulti- 
mate strengths of this improved Portland 
cement. 

The record of service here presented shows 
that 'Incor' is producing the same kind of con- 
crete that skilled contractors have been making 
with Lone Star Cement ever since 1900. For 
behind 'Incor' stands Lone Star's 37-year rec- 
ord for high quality and unvarying uniformity. 



FOR A DECADE, 'Incor' concrete 
walls and roof sections in Moffat 
Tunnel have withstood pressures 
as high as 10 tons to the square 
foot. Shifting masses of earth and 
rock have been held in check. 
Ground waters have been effect- 
ively blocked off— 'Incor' concrete, 
placed in 1927, is watertight, dense, 
impervious. Wood beams in other 
sections of the tunnel required con- 
stant repairs (cost, £75,000 a year) 
and were finally replaced with con- 
crete; but 'Incor' supports a moun- 
tain—hasn't required a dollar's 
worth of maintenance. 



: i 




-32 25 ML CNT PNCT=DENVER COLO 6 
F RAY BISSELL. CHAIRMAN I NTERMAT I CMAL CEMENT CO= 
342 MADISON AVE NE:. IY= 

MOFFAT TUN MEL COMMISSION WANT URGENT DELIVERY ! I NCOR f HIGH 
EARLY STRENGTH CEMENT FIFTEEN THOUSAND BARRELS TO WITHSTAND 
GREATEST PRESSURES EVER ENCOUNTERED IN ROCK TUNNEL WORK= 

j <y 1 1 



THAT WAS OCTOBER 6, 1927 



MOFFA1 Tunnel was being driven through 
the Rocky Mountains. Work proceeded 
ily until engineers encountered the 
famous Ranch Creek fault, where shifting 
rth and rock exerted pressures estimated at 
10 tons per square foot, compressing 6 x 10- 
inch timber blocks into half their thickiK 
To prevent cave-ins, steel beams were used to 
support the mountain, until reinforced con- 
crete could take the load. 

I hdinary concrete did not gain strength fast 
enough. Soft masses of earth and rock above 




the concrete were in constant motion— con- 
crete requiring 7 to 10 days to harden might 

be destroyed 

'Incor' 24-Hour Cement was suggested. The 

telegram shown above was dispatched. And 
tour carloads of the then new l\ -perfected high 
early strength Portland cement weie Started 

at once to the Moffat Tunnel. 

There wasn't enough 'Incor 1 available for 

the entire job, but the Tunnel engineers took 
all the\ umld get, and used it where pressures 
were greatest. 

Invert forms were used for the roof. No ad- 
mixtures were used. In 12 to 18 hours, forms 
were removed — and 'Incor' concrete held back 
the sagging mountain, supported the masses of 



Driven 6 11 miles through the Rockies, Moffat Tunnel is an outstand- 
ing engineering accomplishment Here 'Incor' concrete succeeded in 
supporting a mountain after all previous materials had failed. And 
here 'Incor' has withstood pressure as high as 10 tons per square foot 
for 10 years, without a sign of a flaw or a cent for maintenance. Photo 
shows train leaving East Portal. 



shifting shale and earth. Side-walls were then 
placed. Work went ahead rapidly— all bracing 
was removed after concrete had been in place 
six days. Close examination showed no evi- 
dence of the tremendous pressures the concrete 
was withstanding. 'Incor' met its severest test. 
Proof of high early strength. 

AFTER TEN YEARS 

But what about ultimate strength and durabil- 
ity? The ten-year record speaks for itself. For 
a decade, Tncor' has held in check "the great- 
est pressures ever encountered in rock-tunnel 
work/' Running water, seeping down through 
the mountain above, has been kept out. To 
provide drainage, they had to bore through 
the concrete! 

While wooden beams in other parts of the 



tunnel required constant repair and replace- 
ment (cost, 275,000 a year), Tncor' supports a 
mountain— hasn't required a dollar's worth of 
maintenance since the day it was placed. Proof 
of high ultimate strength and durability. 

SINCE 1927- 

NO MAINTENANCE 

In September, 1927, Pennsylvania Railroad 
completed an extensive relocating and double- 
tracking project on the New York-Pittsburgh- 
St. Louis main line. Bridge at Greenup, 111., 
was the last to be completed. Twenty to 30 
trains a day were scheduled for the new route 
—and savings to be obtained by the new dou- 
ble track, elimination of highway crossings and 
heavy grades, amounted to many dollars daily. 
Mncor' was used for bridge-deck concrete. 










V.vf 











• f 



Since 1928, 'Incor' paving at Main Street and Echo Avenue 
intersection (right) of Boston Post Road, New Rochelle, 
N.Y., has earned 20.000 vehicles a day, including New York- 
New England traffic, with heavy inter-city trucking. Close-up 
(above) shows concrete as sound as the day it was placed. 
Diagram, page 8, indicates both early and ultimatestrengths. 



Left, Spirit of St. Louis, doing eighty, about to cross P.R.R. 
bridge, Greenup, 111., concreted with 'Incor' in 1927. In serv- 
ice 3 weeks sooner — no concrete maintenance in ten years. 



•i a M 
laid 1 A work-ti 

lin- 

lin* 

rith- 

CORE TESTS SHOW 

HIGH ULTIMATE STRENGTHS 



in August, Main v nd 1 i ho \\ r- 

nuc in! I R 

belle, N t 20,000 < in i 

• with '! 

: with 

Ided as tl 

I 24 ho a .is 

I - wzu I ilti critii all) . 

• •Id. »l 

( > I c ii mini • 

■ ' | fft | 

on 

117 
d \t 



HIGH ULTIMATE STRENGTH, TOO 








2 Si * 



iff * Tut - /f ttmh 
CHUA60 LOOP 



TZr 1r 



BOSTON POST HMD - NCW ROOitllC *f 





Here, LaSalle Street — main artery from the North Side to 
Chicago's financial district— crosses Washington Street, im- 
portant east-west highway. Close-up view of 'Incor' paving, 
left, placed October, 1928, shows no evidence of wear, in spite 
of 15,000-car-a-day traffic. Maintenance cost, none. Cored 
August, 1936, 'Incor' strengths averaged 8696 lbs. per sq. in. 
— 1296 lbs. per sq. in. higher than ordinary concrete, placed at 
same time. 



Tncor' cores averaged 6436 lbs. At these ages, 
cores of the ordinary concrete tested 5516 and 
6065 lbs., respectively. 

Then, in October, 1928, City Engineers used 
Tncor' to repave Washington and North 
LaSalle Street intersection in Chicago's Loop 
—traffic count 15,000 cars daily. Late on a 
Saturday, Tncor' was placed on half the inter- 
section. Weather was cold and sleet was fall- 
ing, but this concrete was opened to traffic 
first thing Monday morning. Ordinary con- 
crete, used on the other half of the intersection, 
was opened 7 days later. 'Incor' saved a pro- 
longed traffic snarl. 

In August, 1936, both concrete sections were 
cored. Tncor' cores averaged 8696 lbs. per sq. 
in.; the other concrete averaged 7400 lbs. 
Illustrating the two-way advantage of Tncor' 
Cement— both high-early and high-ultimate 




strengths, with equal dependability. 

RECORD IN HEAVY- 
DUTY FLOOR SERVICE 

In 1929, Tncor' began to attract attention of 
factory-owners, dairymen, and others inter- 
ested in longer-wearing, more watertight con- 
crete. One of the first to make use of Tncor's 
not-a-working-day-lost schedule of floor-re- 
placement was Walnut Grove Dairy, Alton, 
111. Floor slab then in use, badly cracked and 
settled, required constant patching. Equally 
important, a cracked floor cannot be properly 
cleaned— and dairies must meet strict sani- 
tary requirements. 

But business was good, and the floor could 
not be kept out of use. Operations were plan- 
ned to make full use of Tncor's high early 




'Incor' enabled contractors to resurface this 
dairy floor without interruprinf; plant opera- 
tions. At moderate cost, the owner replaced a 
worn-out, cracked, unsanitary floor— constant 
source of trouble and expense-with one that 
is smooth, sanitary, easily kept clean, and 
hasn't cost a cent for maintenance in nearly 8 
years of heavy-duty service 




Close-up of incor' loading dock (left) at Mutual 
Ice & Cold Storage plant, Topeka, Kan., placed 
in 1928. Under hardest service— steel-wheeled 
hand-trucks, barrels bumping out of freight cars 
— this concrete, inspected 8 years later, discloses 
no signs of wear. (Below) Another view of 'Incor' 
loading dock. 



VENTILAT 




strength ; the floor was replaced in four sections, 
working only between 3 p.m. and 5 a.m. 

Pouring began at midnight; concrete was 
tamped into place and properly finished; at 
3 a.m., a day's work was completed. At 5 a.m. 
the surface was hard; light boards were then 
laid on the new concrete and plant operations 
resumed. When the boards were removed, 
within 24 hours, the 'Incor' surface was un- 
marred— no marks even where filled milk cans 
had been dragged off the boards and onto the 
freshly-placed concrete. 

How did the floor stand up: Nearly 8 years 
after the floor was resurfaced, careful inspec- 
tion shows 'Incor' concrete to be good as new. 
Exposed to milk spill, heavy cans rolled across 
the concrete 19 hours every day— not a cent 
for maintenance. Truly, heavy-duty concrete. 



LOADING DOCK TAKES 
A TERRIFIC BEATING 

Cold-storage companies, creameries, laundries, 
freight depots, packinghouses— plant operators 
in general— demand plus values in concrete. 
And they get it when 'Incor' is used for floor 
slabs, loading docks, driveways and in other 
places where both durability and strength are 
essential. During construction, 'Incor' saves 
expensive delays that tie up business; in serv- 
ice, 'Incor' stands up under the daily grind, 
giving years of expense-free service. 

Case in point is the loading dock of Mutual 
Ice & Cold Storage Plant at Topeka, Kan., 
constructed in September, 1928. Inspected 8 
years later, the 'Incor' concrete was found to 
be in perfect condition. Photograph, at top of 



n 



(Right) Loading platform, Indiana Railroad Freight 
Terminal, Indianapolis, resurfaced with 'Incor' in 
1927; in perfect condition today, after nearly ten years 
in constant use. 



(Left > Close-up of * Incor' concrete driveway of Central 
Cold Storage Company, Clark Street, Chicago. Over 
7 years of constant service— carrying 200 trucks a day, 
some weighing 20 tons— 'Incor' concrete good as new 
. . .'Incor' enabled contractor to complete job in two 
wt-tks instead of nine, saved almost two months' con- 
struction time. 



preceding page, indicates the wear to which 
'Incor' has been subjected. Proof of the value 
of better job-curing with 'Incor' — <>t 'Incor's 
ability to make better, longer-wearing concrete, 
because it cures thoroughly in the short time 
ncrete can be kept wet under job conditions. 
At 24 to 4s hours, 'Incor 1 is as thoroughly 
cured as ordinary concrete at 7 to 10 days. 
1 hat means better cone rete, 6 to 8 days sooner. 

200 TRUCKS A DAY 

FOR 7 YEARS -NO UPKEEP 

'No maintenance required/' So, too, reads 

the inspection report on eight 'Incor' driveways 
built tor Central Cold Storage Company, 
Chicago, in 1929. 

Street level was being changed, and it was 
necessary to rebuild sub-structures and paving 

er a sidewalk-vault and basement. Six drive- 




w ays had to be kept in constant use. With ordi- 
nary concrete, each driveway would have been 
out of service 16 days, counting time required 
to wreck and replace supporting structures. 
That meant nine weeks to complete the job. 
With 'Incor', each driveway was placed in ser- 
vice in 48 hours — the entire job took only two 
weeks. Two advantages to the owner: 

(1) Constant access to driveways — full use 
of facilities almost two months sooner; (2) 
longer-wearing concrete, no upkeep expense. 

9 YEARS' SERVICE - 
NO MAINTENANCE 

Indiana Railroad Company reports 78,000 toni 

of freight passed over the Tncor' concrete load- 



12 




ing-platform at Indianapolis Freight Terminal 
in the year ended August 31, 1936. It was less- 
than-carload business— everything from oil 
drums to portable garages— and put plenty of 
pressure on the steel truck wheels. But the 
'Incor' concrete platform floor, placed in 1927, 
is still in excellent shape. Nearly 10 years' 
service— no maintenance. 

Reason for using 'Incor' : Old wood deck \\ as 
badly worn, had to be replaced. There was no 
other platform available, so the new structure 
had to be built without interrupting service. 

'Incor' solved the problem. On Saturday 
afternoon the railway's construction gang be- 
gan work. Early Monday morning the new 
concrete was in use; not a working day lost; 
no interference with freight service. And, as a 
plus value, the concrete is in excellent condi- 



tion today, good for many years to come. 

WATERTIGHT SINCE 1929 
-IN A COAL MINE 

After ten years, many structures which keep 
water in or out, clearly demonstrate the greater 
watertightness of well-made 'In< ncrete. 

Case in point is the mine shaft of Mercantile 
Coal & Mining Co., Richmond, Mo. Quicksand 
and water 50 feet below surface made timber 
bracing ineffective. Ordinary concrete gained 
strength too slowly, so 'Incor' was used. 

Concrete was placed in four-foot sections. 
When the shaft extended above the surface, 
the concrete lining was forced down with a 30- 
ton weight. A cave-in at the 70-foot level threw 
the shaft six feet out of plumb. Two hundred 



13 







Quicksand and water have been held in check since 1929 by this 
Richmond, Mo., 'Incor' mine-shaft lining. 'Incor' enabled Mercantile 
Coal & Mining Co. to complete the job three months sooner. 






/^ 











tons pressure was applied to force the shaft 
back in place— without concrete failure. 

For more than seven years, pressures of water 
and quicksand have been held in check. "Still 
watertight," reports F. R. Atwill, Manager, 
Mercantile Coal & Mining Company— still 
watertight, without a dollar for waterproofing 
or repairs. 

EXPOSED TO SEA 
FOR 8 YEARS 

Today, engineers also specify Incor' for con- 
crete exposed to salt-water action, because ex- 



14 



i 



perience shows that 'Incor' concrete, properly 
made, is not only inherently watertight, but 
successfully withstands the chemical action of 
sea-water. 

In 1928, when Tampa, Fla., Union Terminal 
was constructed, 'Incor' was used because it 
also offered a cheaper method of constructing 
dock piling and slabs. Behind-schedule con- 
struction of a 200-ft. section of the dock threat- 
ened to delay opening. Delay meant interfer- 
ence with shipping — and tying up a $3,000,000 
investment. Tncor' put the job backon schedule. 

'Incor' concrete piles, lifted three days after 
casting, were driven to refusal 24 hours later, 
without sign of fracture. Dock work followed 
immediately, with forms stripped four days 
after pouring. Result, job completed 21 days 
sooner— saving #10,000 in job overhead and 
rentals alone. 

Recent inspection of dock-slab and piling 
shows Tncor' is providing the kind of expense- 
free service owners want; watertightness pre- 
vents damage by sea-water action and sea 




Close-up of 18" x 18" x 60' 'Tncor* piling, driven to refusal 4 days after 
pouring. Tncor' saved 310,000 in job overhead and rentals when 
Tampa Union Terminal Dock was constructed in 1928. Watertight- 
ness demonstrated by excellent condition today, after 8 years' sea- 
water exposure. Scores of other seacoast structures, from Galveston, 
Texas, to Portland, Maine, testify to the durability of concrete made 
with Tncor.' 



TAMPMUNIDN TERMINj 





(Ri^lv of rhe 'Inc • deck 

lohnsbur> 

, 

in hrsr-i 

Bridge. 

this 

• ntr. 




t (i 






growths; greater durability has withstood con- 
►n< rete in first-class condi- 
tioi irs 1 exposure. 

PLACED AT 28° IN 1928, 
PERFECT CONDITION TODAY 

Temperature fell to 28 degrees when 4 Im 
deck slab was placed on the Hastings Bridge, 
St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in November, 192 
"Looks ().K. now, but will it last? 91 engineers 
id. For proper winter curing is difficult; some- 
times, applied heat dries concreteouttooquickly 
— resulting in inferior work that soon sh< 



signs of wear; or, if insufficient heat is used, 
concrete may freeze before it hardens suffi- 
ciently- again resulting unfavorably. But, after 
more than 8 years, this bridge deck shows no 
sign of wear; nothing has been spent for con- 
crete maintenance. 

*Incor' takes the hazard out of cold-weather 
concreting, because it cures or hardens in one- 
fifth the usual time. Result, heat-protection 
ire 60 to 70 per cent lower — form rc-use 
i- -peeded up, one let does the wort eral 

— work proceeds almost on summer schedules. 
'Incor' make- \ ear-around building an econom- 
ical reality. 






7 YEARS, NO UPKEEP, ON 
CAR-TRACK PAVING 



Concrete car-track paving, placed by Topeka, 
Kan., Street Railway System in 1929, looks as 
smooth and free from wear as if it had just been 
laid. About 1200 vehicles an hour pass over 
this concrete. On October 5, 1936, Kansas 
Power & Light Company wrote: u 'Incor' slab 
installed in 1929 on our street railway right-of- 
way has proved very satisfactory. Our mainte- 
nance at that point has been practically nothing." 
1 1 ere Minor 1 was used with one thought upper- 
most in mind — to speed up work, enable the 
company to clear the streets and obtain early 
use of the track. 'Hie 'Incor' concrete was 
under traffic within 24 hours after it was placed. 
Years of expense-free service confirm the wis- 
dom of the engineers* selection. 



No maintenano Inn I Ins lopcka (Can., car*traci paving wai 

placed in 1929 Photo (abov< ihowi present condition (Bel 

I i .itfn count, 1 1 I how 'Iih od a* nen 
aftei ii' 



I4JJR 





Canal Street, New Orleans, scene of Mardi Gras. 'Incur' repaving without traffic interruption, saved mer- 
chants $200,000 trade loss in 1929. No upkeep expense, concrete good as new, after 8 years' hard wear. 




MERCHANTS SAVED $200,000 
-NOT A CENT FOR UPKEEP 

To tie up Canal Street, New Orleans, at Mardi 
(iras time would be like barricading New York's 
Broadway on New Year's Eve. Yet, in Decem- 
ber, 192V, New Orleans contracted to repave 
Canal Street from Claiborne Street to the River 
— 18 blocks of paving, with 21-ft. sidewalks. 
Merchants demanded quick action. Forty- 
nine thousand square yards of pavement and 
45,000 square yards of sidewalks and neutral 
zone paving had to be constructed — but con- 
structed with "business as usual." Ordinary 
Portland cement meant several months of de- 
moralized business; traffic would have to be 
re-routed; and Mardi Gras, only a few weeks 
off, intensified the problem. 



So Tncor' was used throughout the job. 
Paved a section at a time — opened the next 
day — concrete work went forward rapidly. 
Each block was finished 11 days sooner. Car 
service was normal. Merchants estimated Tncor' 
saved them at least 3200,000 net profit on sales 
that would have been lost had the street been 
barricaded while ordinary concrete hardened. 

Today, after more than 7 years, taxpayers 
share merchants' satisfaction — for the Tncor' 
concrete is good as new — not a cent for main- 
tenance! 

SO, BETTER CEMENT 

DOES MAKE BETTER CONCRETE 

Low night temperatures prevailed, back in Oc- 
tober, 1928, when New York Central Railroad 




<i 






station plaza at Ossining, N. Y., was repaved 
with 'Incor.' To avoid traffic tie-up, paving 
was laid in 70 sections, each section opened to 
traffic in 24 hours. A huge electric transformer 
was trucked over 36-hour-old 'Incor' slabs 
without damage to the freshly-placed concrete. 
Entire job was completed in 10 days — 30 days 
sooner than possible with ordinary concrete. 

In spite of heavy traffic, 'Incor' concrete is as 
smooth and sound as opening day. And that, 
in a nutshell, is the service record of 'Incor' in 
all classes of construction, under pitiless wear 
and gruelling exposure. For these are not hand- 
picked jobs— they are fairly and squarely typi- 
cal of the kind of service 'Incor' is giving. 

Truly, then, this better Portland cement 
does make better concrete. 



9000 



.< 8000 




)^?000 

I 

^1000 



, T«' t5 i 



hE-32 Concrete 
l} -Zi'in. Slump 



id. 2d 3d Id. 26 d 2*yr. djyr 

Age at Test -log. scale. 

STATION PLAZA, N.Y. CENTRAL R.R.'OSSININGjN.Y. 



Ossining, N. Y., Station Plaza (below) was replaced with 'Incor' in October, 
1928. Nights were cold but concrete was opened to traffic in 24 hours. Present 
condition— smooth and sound as day it was placed. Diagram (above) shows 
high ultimate as well as early strength with 'Incor'— better service, any way 
you look at it. 




^ « 



WHAT THE RECORD PROVES 






10 



The ten-year record of 'Incor' 24-Hour Cement surprises no one 
who is familiar with the care and skill with which the product is 
made. For durability and uniformity are built into the cement at 
the factory. Before a single barrel of 'Incor' was ever shipped, 
laboratory investigations showed that 'Incor' concrete would have 
exceptional strength and wear-resistance. The test of time now 
confirms these findings. In brief, here is what this record of a dec- 
ade of service means to the specifier and user of concrete. 

L 24-HOUR SERVICE STRENGTH -Reduced caring costs . . . Faster fol- 
low-up operations . . . Marked winter economies. 

Minimized flood hazard, frost-damage and cave-in risks. 

Earlier occupancy . . . Uninterrupted use during plant remodeling and 
repairs ... No plant tie-ups. 

Less traffic disruption on streets and highways, fewer detours, substantial 
l mgs to the motoring public. Minimized loss to property owners; fewer 
lost sales for business men. 

a. EARLIER FORM REMOVAL -Overhead and non-productive time re- 
duced . . . Labor efficiency increased . . . Form economies— less lumber 
and benchwork. 

J. BETTER CONCRETE-lireaur workability, easier-to-place concrete, less 
BM for finishing Better wearing quality, greater durability. 

4. MORE WATERTIGHT CONCRETE -Thorough curmg ,n 1 to 2 day* 
■ d Of 7 to 10 days i. reduced curing costs; no admixtures needed. 
Assured results, bettei 

The net of it is that 'Incor* has made concrete a ready-to-use con- 
struction material-at the same time providing in finished com rete 
all thoK qualities of strength, durability and uatertightness which 
have made Lone Star Cement the standard of quality foi more 
than 35 years. 

Two Portland cements to meet every structural requirement- 
use 'Incur' when it ihowi you a profit; otheru.se, U s C Lone Star 
Cement. You gain either way, because better cement makes better 
concrete. 



AFTER TEN YEARS IN HIGHWAY SERVICE 












TO WOID 40-M1IT DMOl'R. 4 : (*) hMs of 'Incoi* 24-H nt were used in repaying Lincoln Highway, 

mar Ligonier, Pa., in 1929, Traffic. 1600 vehicles daily — summer week-ends ^ ; 00 cars a da jcIc traffic, 

da\ and night. In winter, anon and Ice, grinding tire chains. Tough service, a stern test of concrete. Yet, the Tncor* 
surface is as smooth and sound as the dj\ ir \s as opened. 1 ypical of Tncor's ten-year record in highway service. 




I 



$000 




^&- 



l-Z-5 M,a 
3 - in Slump 



Ay* at Test- log. ical* 
L/M£DAL£ 4 INDIANA. 




-Y SOUTHERN R 




TO AVOID DELAY to cement shipments, Manhattan Road intersection near Lone Star 
Cement mill, Limedale, Ind., was repaved with 'Incor' in 1927. Weather was cold, rainy; so con- 
crete was opened in 40 hours, when 2100 bbls. of cement in Mack trucks, 75 sacks to the truck, 
humped up onto the pavement, without injury to the concrete— then or later. Diagram (left) 
shows ultimate as well as early strength. 




1=.000 C\RS \ D\Y use U S. 

Route 40 a' Kansas ( o\ Chi \- 

rolei plant Rewrfaced 

with 'Incor* in 1928 to avoid 

traffic tanple. concrete ■ in firat- 

class shape today, as close-up 
(fight) clearly shows; no mainte- 
nance. 'Incor', ilto used in ad- 
jacent Kansas Citv Southern 
OV< rpass. reduced form costs and 
minimized "slow -order' Ope rat K*n. 




OPENED IN 24 HOURS, Tncor' prevented serious traffic disruption in 1928, 
while resurfacing Blue Mound Road (left), 4-lane highway, west out of Mil- 
waukee, at Glen View Avenue intersection, Wauwatosa. Close-up (above) 
shows concrete in first-class condition today; no maintenance. 



RAINY SEASON "GI'MHo" 
DETOUR was avoided in 1 
by using 'Incor' for intersections 
on Old Spanish Trail (below), 
Fort Bend County, Texas. Sub- 
sequent subgrade settlement 
was corrected with mud-jacks. 
But 'Incor' concrete still pro- 
vides good riding surface. Close- 
up photo (right) shows prac- 
tically no wear— finishing marks 
still visible. 






up 

i . * i • / 

*e* *> ^*. J* . 



9 
t 



*%* 






», 

1 ; 



J ^m 



MASSACHl SETTS PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT first used W in 1928, to 
repave secnons of Mam Street Waltham. Mass. Concrete opened in 24 to 36 hours. Traffic 
count, 8000 cars, 1500 trucks daily. 'Incor' in excellent condition today, II close-up (upper 
right) sho, ng ht) md.cates progressive strength development, comparing 'Incor' 

with rich-mix ordinary concrete on same project. 



3000 




4 
I 



4000 



$000 



£ zooo 
jf iooo 



l'I : '^-— 



^-S>.c J-i 



-^^o.t 



Core Tests , Comparing 
/NCOQ versus Rich ¥tx 
. and regular m/x made 
with Ordinary Portland 
Cement on same Job. 



Aoe at Test - Jo$. scale 
WALT HAM, MASS. 



Syr: 




IN SUB-FREEZING WEATHER, winter 
l'>2x, Pennsylvania Highway Department 
widened and resurfaced "Bottleneck" High- 
pray, west hank Susquehanna River, oppo- 
site Hamshurg. Detour impossible, as phoro- 
graph (left), suggests. 'Incor' con- 
covered with burlap and straw, was opened 
in 24 hours, as necessary ro maintain unin- 
terrupted halfway rrafhc, 1 7.000 cars daily. 
Condition report: "As good as day concrete 
was opened." 



STREETS AND ALLEYS 




EXCHANGI STREET, BOSTON, grouted with 
'Incur* in 1928, was opened 6 days sooner, saving traffic 
congestion and business loss to merchants. 'Incor* is as 
strong as the granite paving which it binds — taking the 
wear of 15,000 vehicles a day. 




UNINTERRUPTED USE OF INDUSTRIAL STREETS, essential to modem business, 
is assured by using 'Incor' — better concrete, too, as demonstrated by this Kansas City 
industrial alley, connecting 13th and 14rh Streets, serving a leading hotel and provision 
house. Concreted in 1928, opened in 24 hours— no maintenance, except for utility openings. 






1 


**«-!' 



BUSIEST THOROUGHFARE in Washington's principal industrial 
section, "K" Street, N.W., near Lone Star's District of Columbia 
warehouse (right) was resurfaced with incoi', avoiding costly disrup- 
tion of heavy business traffic. Placed in 1929; close examination (see 
above) shows concrete in excellent condition, under traffic ot 3876 
vehicles, mostly trucks, every working day. 



25 




, -IHTY- 

R. R. 
• Ijnra (right) 
surfaced with 'Incor' 1: 
good as new roday. 'Im 

n substructure: first-half 
removed in 24 hours, 
for other half. Job 
comj kl sooner. 



TWO SAVINGS TO INDUSTRY 




AN ALMOST CONTINUOUS STREAM OF TRUCKS uses this driveway to Hibbard, Spencer &c Bartlert's Chicago warehouse. 
In 1929, old water-bound macadam surface was replaced wirh 'Incur. 1 Placed Saturday and Sunday, opened 23 hours after last 
-no business interruption. Concrete shows no sign of wear, after 8 years' hard service. Illustrating 'Incor saving 



pour 



to industry— (1) by eliminating costly interference with plant operation. (2) by economies through long, expense-free serwee. 



27 



RAILROAD OPERATING ECONOMIES 



RIPA< IFK Tunnd,< 

Summit, Mo., built 

double-track cut-off, St Louis 

. 1 unnt-l fomi'l' 
deti-rmint-d date cut-off could be 
placed in sirvio I ling 'Incur', one 
tingle form 
] 
hours a!'f r pla< ing I OIK r< u lining 
foil. • ,n drilling I >|M r a t ions. 

\\ < i ks wt n laved. 'Incor 1 hi 

mirni 

^nd tun- i is in first-class 

condinon today, no maintenance. 



son\ illc I erminal 

plant i 

W ilkis. 
iny. 







"TO MAKE SURE IT'S WATERTIGHT" 



"To make sure of getting a watertight structure in a residential district and prevent leakage that might flood basements 
of nearby homes," was New Haven, Conn., Water Company's stated reason for using 'Incor' for Mill Rock Reservoir. In 
5 years since completion, 'Incor' has made assurance doubly sure— concrete in excellent condition. Illustrating how 'Incor' 
helps assure watertightness-by curing thoroughly in short time concrete can be kept wet: 24 to 48 hours with 'Incor*, 
instead of the all-but-impossible 7 to 10 days. 




■ 






29 



(Right) AN UNPAVED DRIVE, impassable due to heavy rains, prevented Mr. & Mrs. 
J. R. Hunter, Decatur, Ala., from occupying their new home. They paved it with 'Incor* 
and moved in 20 hours later. That was in 1929; today the drive is as sound as on the 
opening day. 

(Below) WEATHER WAS COLD, but forms were released in 24 hours, when construct- 
ing concrete flume for Smith Paper Co., Lee, Mass., in 1931. Flume and 250-h.p. water- 
wheel were in service days sooner. 'Incor' provided stronger, denser, more watertight 
concrete, thoroughly cured in 24 to 48 hours, at a £500 saving. Bone-dry concrete protects 
paper stock in basement next to flume. 






/, 



\\ VII R • I 

it of poor 
drainage. 






IV 






KYREFRI 

plan*, gunited with 'In( 

- 
cured ■ Mopped water *eepa*t, produced a dr 



30 



PILING AND PRODUCTS 



PILING DRIVEN 3 WEEKS EARLIER, curing period reduced 70%, saved 20 days in erecting 
Louisiana's 33-story Capitol building, Baton Rouge, housing all State government departments. 
Earlier occupancy saved 320,000 in rentals. Typical of 'Incor's advantages in pre-cast concrete work. 



*: 

* 




- r*m*:;Jk 






*, 



>*fc i 




■ *■•«- 

'^i id 



CAST IX 1929, incor' transmission poles (below^) are in excellent condition today— 
"Good as day it was cast," reads suruv report. First poles built with Mncor', tested 
m 4^ hours, exceeded resulti previously attained at 6 months, so manufacturer 
switched to 'Incor*. Ultimate as well as early aJ\antages amply jusnhed the action. 



m 



DRIVEN WHEN 5 DAYS OLD-2 weeks sooner than ordi- 
nary concrete— 'Incor' piling for Kansas City (Mo.) Power & 
Light Co. garage (above) withstood 90 blows from 5000-1 b. 
hammer after pile-point reached bedrock. Shaft was sunk par- 
allel to one of 495 piles, to get "low-down" on condition. Photo 
(below I shows pile tip, which had chewed its way into bedrock, 
Kansas City's "Calico Ledge." 




CONCRETE FRAME ERECTION 



The frame is the only part of a building where work can be speeded up without increasing costs — and usually at substan- 
tial savings. This principle, established by 10 years' experience, is illustrated by various structures at Louisiana State 
University, Baron Rouge. In Field House, shown below, Tncor' saved 30 days' job overhead and the cost of one form-set — 
total saving, #4200. 1 his building gets strenuous wear; all concrete in perfect condition, after 7 years' service. 




IS 




ON WALL-BEARING as well as con- 
crete-frame stucrures, 'Incor' shows sub- 
stantia! savings. West wing of Methodist 
Home, Topeka, Kansas, erected 1929 
■el of formt, jumped up from floor to floor 
in 24 to 4S hours. Saved one extra form 
set, and concrete kept ■head of brick- 
layers. Job completed 20 days sooner, with 
corresponding saving in overhead. FloOfl 
and ceilings in excellent condition. 






r Dl RING UIMI R, i , M||| 




founder 



. 




F 






-*i ~ 



BRIDGES: BETTER CONCRETE AT LOWER COST 

Arlington Memorial Bridge, Washington, D. C, where 'Incor', used in key-ways, made it possible to release forms 10 days 
looner. Faster form re-use meant substantial savings. In 10 to 12 hours, 'Incor' concrete was strong enough to resist move- 
ment of steel falsework due to temperature change— avoiding serious structural hazard. At one and two days, 'Incor' 
provided strengths equal to 10 days with rich-mix ordinary concrete. Typical of 'Incor's ten-year record in bridge construc- 
tion—lower costs, smoother operation, faster turnover. And better concrete, cured thoroughly in one-fifth the usual time. 







'INCOR' SAVED 12 DAYS, S300— 
when used on abutments, footings and 
arch of Fowler River Bridge (right), 
Bristol, N. H., enabling contractor to 
avoid contract penalty. Placed in 1930, 
all concrete in excellent condition. 





(Below) TRAFFIC TUNNEL, East Pittsburgh, Pa., built in 1929-30. 
'Incor' used in sidewalls and arch-ring, saved form expense. Concrete 
in perfect condition, after supporting 80-ft. fill for 6 years. No scaling, 
no seepage. 8,000 vehicles, <s0< [ trucks, pass over this fill daily. 




(Left! TOLL BRIDGE between Charleston, N\ H., and Springfield, 
Yt.. 'Incor', used in bridge seats and parapets, enabled contractor to 
start steel-erection 14 days sooner, with corresponding reduction in 
job overhead and earlier toll revenue. Inspection shows concrete in 
first-class condition. 



fit & "' 



COLD-WEATHER CONCRETING 



WOBURN'S CITY HAM, was concreted in tyi 
chusetts winter weathe r slabs 

and roof. Concrete was self-supporting 
that much ru . on on each Hoor, earlier re- 

form O urc J t hoi 

ours, are stronger, denser, more waterti^t 
perfect condition today. 




RFTFD U saved 

i heat-cunng on Twin Bridge (al 
reduced job overhead through earlier com; 
lass cond; 



37 



HENCE, THIS TIMELY SUGGESTION 



A structural material is only as good as the men who use it. That 
being so, it follows that this ten-year record of the strength, durabil- 
ity and economy of 'Incor' 24-Hour Cement is, first of all, a tribute 
to the architects, engineers and contractors whose skill is here re- 
flected. To these men we express thanks and appreciation. This 
decade of experience with 'Incor* may be summarized briefly, as 
follows: 

1. REDUCED CONCRETING COSTS— Service-strong in 24 hours, 'Incor* 
does away with non-productive time waiting for concrete to harden, re- 
duces forming costs, promotes smoother, steadier job operation. 'Incor' 
also moves into place easier, gives greater workability, helps to reduce 
placing costs, 

9. BETTER JOB-CURED CONCRETE -'Incor' cures thoroughly in 24 to 
48 hours, instead of 8 to 10 days. That means reduced curing costs and 
thorough cunng in the short time concrete can be kept wet; better-looking 
concrete, with less finishing— stronger, denser, more watertight concrete. 

I. KNOWN DEPENDABILITY-When 'Incor' was introduced, the con- 
struction industries accepted it with confidence, because behind 'Incor* 
stood Lone Star's record for outstanding quality and unvarying uniformity. 
Now 'lncor's ten-year service record merges with the 35-year record of 
Lone Star to provide an even greater measure of assured dependability. 

Hence, this timely suggestion: Estimate the dollars-and-cents value 
of 'lncor's early strength and rapid curing. When it shows you a 
profit, use *Incor\* Otherwise, use Lone Star. You gain either way 
— because better cement makes better concrete 

•Rt C I k Fat Off. 




TWO PORTLAND CEMEN I 
meet e\ery structural need. I se Tncor' 
when its dependable high early strength 
shows you a proht. Otbei Lone 

in either u ay — because 
better cement makes better concr 



tm